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A woman comforts her daughter after placing flowers in front of an impromptu memorial in front of the RCMP detachment April 20, 2020 in Enfield, Nova Scotia, Canada. It was the home detachment of killed RCMP constable Heidi Stevenson, who was one of 19 people killed in the Sunday shooting, including the gunman. The unleashing, which was the worst massacre in Canada, began on Saturday evening in Portapique and continued in other rural communities in the Maritime provinces.

A woman comforts her daughter after placing flowers in front of an impromptu memorial in front of the RCMP detachment April 20, 2020 in Enfield, Nova Scotia, Canada. It was the home detachment of killed RCMP constable Heidi Stevenson, who was one of 19 people killed in the Sunday shooting, including the gunman. The unleashing, which was the worst massacre in Canada, began on Saturday evening in Portapique and continued in other rural communities in the Maritime provinces. (Photo: Tim Krochak, Getty Images)

TORONTO Canadas The worst mass shooting broke out after an argument between the shooter and his girlfriend, who survived the attack, said a police official.

The official confirmed to The Associated Press on Thursday that the weekend’s gunfire in Nova Scotia was the result of a domestic dispute involving the couple. The official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said more details would be provided at a press conference on Friday.

Police say Gabriel Wortman, 51, acted alone in the shooting that killed at least 22 people in northern and central Nova Scotia. There are 16 crime scenes in five different rural communities in northern and central Nova Scotia.

The suspect was killed on Sunday morning, around 1 p.m. after the attacks began.

Several bodies were found inside and outside a house in the rural town of Portapique, police said. Bodies were also found in four other communities, and authorities believe that the gunman targeted his first victims, but then started to attack at random while he was driving.

More: At least 18 people have died in Canada, shooting a 12-hour rampage

Police said Wortman carried out much of the police-disguised attack in a vehicle marked to look like a patrol car. They say he shot people in and around their homes and set houses on fire in Portapique.

Wortman, who owned a dental prosthesis in the town of Dartmouth near Halifax, lived part-time in Portapique, residents said. Atlantic Denture Clinic, his practice, was closed last month due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Authorities said Wortman had no criminal record, but information was later revealed from at least one incident with the law. Nova Scotia court records confirm that he was sentenced to receive counseling to manage his anger after pleading guilty to assaulting a man in the Halifax area on October 29, 2001.

The guilty plea was entered on October 7, 2002, when his trial was about to begin. He was placed on probation for nine months, fined $ 50 and had to stay away from the man. He was also prohibited from owning or possessing a weapon, ammunition or explosive substances.

Mass shooting is relatively rare in Canada. The country revised its gun control laws after Marc Lepine killed 14 women and himself to death at the Collège Polytechnique de Montréal in 1989. Before the weekend was unleashed, it was the worst shooting mass in Canada.

Two years ago Thursday, a man drove a pickup truck along a busy sidewalk in Toronto and killed 10 people and injured 16. The suspect, who is awaiting trial, said he committed the attack in retaliation for years of sexual rejection and ridicule by women.

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